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The internet, a massive collection of computers linked by electronic signals and governed by a set of shared software protocols that allow packets of data to be passed from one computer to another. Now, you get that data via your internet service provider (ISP), which routes the data from servers to your computer or smartphone. You probably know these ISPs as telecom companies—AT&T, Comcast, Verizon, Sprint.

ISPs currently are paid by you, the end user. You pay them to give you access to the entire internet they send you all the content you ask for at one set cost and speed, treating one data packet just the same as another. This is net neutrality, where all online content is treated equally.

The telecom companies, however, complain that some content, like streaming video, takes up more bandwidth or data than, say, sending a text message. They argue that the new high-bandwidth content costs them money and that content providers (such as YouTube or Netflix) should pay for how much bandwidth they use. Without c urrent Net Neutrality regulations, ISPs would be allowed to ask content providers to pay a toll to get on the internet highway, where there will be slow lanes and fast lanes depen ding on the amount a company pays.

Now, in 2015 the Federal Communication Commission (or the FCC) signed into law, under the Obama Administration, Net Neutrality guidelines known as the Open Internet Order which the FCC itself describes briefly as “an order which will enact strong, sustainable rules to protect the Open Internet and ensure that Americans reap the economic, social, and civic benefits of an Open Internet today and into the future” 

Which is exactly what citizens had been fighting towards for years. But the fight is not over, the new Trump designated FCC Chairman Ajit Pai, is attempting to, as he put it himself “attack the current Net Neutrality rules with a weed wacker”