defendant people are also three times more likely

defendant is guilty beyond a reasonable doubt. If guilt is
determined then at the third level which is the corrections system is
implemented in forms of incarceration or probation to correct the behavior of
the offender.

            When we look at the levels of our
criminal justice system we realize that each level is dependent on one another.
The prison systems are dependent on the courts and sentencing. This is how
prisons get their inmates. The courts are dependent on law enforcement to bring
charges against perpetrators of crimes in order to have a case. Law enforcement
is dependent on the courts because the courts confirm the legality of the
charges or arrest made against criminal perpetrators. Within the criminal
justice system this is an ongoing cycle. As much as we admire our justice system
for the foundation and serenity it’s supposed to create within our society we
should also admonish our criminal justice system for the disparities it has
created. When we look at the levels of our criminal Justice system we have to
ask are our laws being implemented fairly?

            There are clear racial disparities in sentencing
decisions in the United States. Sentences imposed on Black males in the federal
system are nearly 20 percent longer than those imposed on White males convicted
of similar crimes. Unfortunately Black and Latino offenders sentenced in state
and federal courts face increasingly greater odds of incarceration than
similarly situated White offenders. In some jurisdictions even when there are
comparable criminal histories Black male federal defendants receive longer
sentences than Whites arrested for the same offenses. (Paragraph References
from ACLU, 2014)

            With the racial disparities occurring through our courts
it’s no surprise that these racial disparities would also be found in sentencing
of drug offenders. The war on drugs has been a war on people of color and the
racial disparities are stunning. Even though White and Black people use drugs
at similar rates, Black people are jailed on drug charges 10 times more often than
White people are. Black people are also three times more likely to be arrested
for marijuana than White people are. (Paragraph References Bureau of Justice Statistics,
2015)

            The impact of the drug war
has been astonishing. In the past thirty years, the U.S penal population
exploded from around 300,000 to more than 2 million, with drug convictions
accounting for the majority of the increase. (Alexander, 2012) “The United
States now has the highest rate of incarceration in the world, dwar?ng the
rates of nearly every developed country, even surpassing those in highly
repressive regimes like Russia, China, and Iran. In Germany, 93 people are in
prison for every 100,000 adults and children. In the United States, the rate is
roughly eight times that, or 750 per 100,000.”(Alexander, 2012)

            Many studies show that
people of all colors use and sell illegal drugs at remarkably similar rates
however, those studies often suggest that Whites, particularly White youth, are
more likely to engage in drug crimes than people of color. Even though surveys
suggest Whites use illegal drugs at higher rates predominately people of color
are entering our nation’s prisons and jails, and now our prisons are over
flowing with Black and Brown drug offenders. In some states Black men are
incarcerated on drug charges at rates twenty to fifty times greater than those
of White men. In major cities wracked by the drug war, as many as 80 percent of
young African American men now have criminal records from drug offenses. (Paragraph
References Alexander, 2012)

            Another major racial disparity that
occurred for many years was how laws were passed in states giving sentencing
standards for crack or cocaine possession. The drug crack is just another form of cocaine,
it is essentially powder cocaine mixed with water and
baking soda which is