A weight over a period of 6 months

A major risk factor for
serious diseases such as cardiovascular disease, heart disease, and stroke, and
a primary cause of chronic kidney failure, non-traumatic lower-extremity
amputations, and blindness is Diabetes. Type 2 diabetes can be delayed or
avoided, through intensive of lifestyle, diet, and physical activity, that will
reduce excess body weight to get normal weight and prevented obesity for some
cases that can occurs. The Diabetes Prevention Program lifestyle intervention
shown that 58% decrease in the occurrence of type 2 diabetes among overweight
adults of difference race, gender and ethnicity at high-risk of developing type
2 diabetes. Results for The Diabetes Prevention Program in lifestyle
intervention showing achievement in dicreases of body weight over a period of 6
months with the range of 5–7%.

      The systematic review and meta-analysis
were conducted following the PRISMA guidelines. Firstly criteria were,
randomized controlled trials or cohort studies with or without a control group
that evaluated the effect of an intervention on weight loss. Next, based on the
Diabetes Prevention Program of lifestyle intervention shows that curriculum delivered
via eHealth approaches such as online applications, social media, addicted in
playing games, mobile applications, and certain computer-based telehealth
applications. After that, participants ages more than 18 years of age residing
in the US and lastly, study results published in English in a review article. Twenty-two
studies met the criteria for this research and which 26 interventions were
evaluated from this twenty-two studies after been review. Samples were choosen
are white and college educated people. Interventions included Web-based applications,
mobile phone applications, text messages, DVDs, interactive voice response
telephone calls, telehealth video conferencing, and video on-demand programing.
Nine interventions delivered post-baseline exclusively using eHealth were stand
by themselves and another seventeen interventions included additional
behavioral support provided by counselors post-baseline remotely with
communication technology or face-to-face. The estimated overall effect on mean
percentage weight loss from baseline to up to 15 months of follow-up across all
the interventions was ?3.98%. The subtotal estimate across the stand-alone
eHealth interventions was ?3.34% and it was less than the estimate across
interventions with behavioral support given by a counselor remotely which is ?4.31%,
and the estimate across interventions with behavioral support given by a
counselor in-person was ?4.65%. There is promising evidence of the efficacy of
DPP-based eHealth interventions on weight loss.

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      Searching Medline, Cochrane, EMBASE, and
Google Scholar for randomized controlled trials that compared the standard of
care with treatment regimens that included changes in lifestyle  that is intervention group. The primary
outcome was reduction in risk factors of cardiovascular disease including body
mass index (BMI), glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c), systolic blood pressure (SBP),
diastolic blood pressure (DBP), high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-c),
and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-c). as a result, a total of 16
studies were included in the meta-analysis. The standardized difference in
means of change from baseline significantly favored the intervention compared with
the control group in BMI. There was no difference between the intervention and control
groups in HDL-c and LDL-c.

      One of the first randomized clinical
trials to demonstrate that a chronic disease could be prevented by adopting
lifestyle changes was The Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP). PubMed and Ovid
databases were searched to identify peer-reviewed original research articles on
DPP-based translations for adults at-risk for developing diabetes or
cardiovascular disease, limited to English language publications from January
2002–March 2015. The end of this study, 72 original research articles
describing 57 translation studies met eligibility criteria. All 57 study
interventions included a physical activity goal, 47 studies which is 82%
collected participant physical activity information, and 34 which is 60%
provided physical activity results. All 57 studies identified physical activity
as a key component of lifestyle interventions and provided a goal for physical
activity. The Diabetes Prevetion Program goal of 150 min of moderate physical
activity was utilized by 54 studies and three studies established alternative
goals including one with 180 min of moderate physical activity per week, one
with 200 min of moderate physical activity per week, and one with 4000 steps
per day above baseline physical activity level. The absence of physical
activity assessment standards or guidelines for use in community-based
translation programs and the under- and inconsistent reporting of physical
activity results in lifestyle change programs. Improvement in physical activity
assessment techniques and complete reporting of information on physical
activity assessment methods and outcomes at critical time periods will increase
the ability to examine the relationships between different levels of physical
activity and key clinical outcomes.

      The hypothesis that an intensive
lifestyle intervention for weight loss would achieve significantly greater
reductions in cardiovascular disease morbidity and mortality than a control
condition of diabetes support and education among participants with Type 2 Diabetes
Mellitus. A number of significant and long-term improvements were observed for
Intensive Lifestyle Intervention, including body weight, physical fitness and
physical function, glucose control, quality-of-life, and healthcare costs.
However, Intensive Lifestyle Intervention did not significantly reduce
cardiovascular disease-related morbidity/mortality such as cardiovascular
disease death, non-fatal myocardial infarction, non-fatal stroke, hospitalized
angina after nearly 10 years of follow-up. There was a suggestion of
heterogeneity of response based on the history of prior cardiovascular disease
at baseline (p = 0.06). Despite the overall lack of cardiovascular disease risk
reduction, Intensive Lifestyle Intervention remains important for care of
patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus, particularly when accompanied by
medication management. In particular, Intensive Lifestyle Iitervention may be
an appealing option for patients wanting to minimize medication
intensification. Also, Intensive Lifestyle Intervention carries with it other
potential benefits important to patients. For example, improvements in physical
functioning and quality of life. Based on data from other trials, intensive
medication management, such as tight glycemic control, is not without potential
risks, which should be weighed in making treatment decisions.

      The aim of this study was to assess, in a
group of people with type 2 diabetes, the impact of baseline values of
glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) on the effects of an intensive lifestyle
intervention on metabolic, clinical and strength parameters. For methods, 222
people with type 2 diabetes with mean standard deviation baseline HBA1c of
7.50% 1.27, were enrolled in a 3-month structured multidisciplinary lifestyle
intervention. Anthropometric, biochemical, clinical and fitness measurements
were collected at baseline, at the end of the lifestyle intervention program
and at the two-year follow-up visit. Significant improvements in glycometabolic
control, anthropometric parameters and systemic blood pressure were observed
both at the end of the three month intensive lifestyle program and at the
two-year follow up visit. In addition, defined daily doses of hypoglycaemic
treatment significantly decreased. Fitness measures exhibited significant
increments in the whole sample at the end of the intensive intervention program.
When patients were divided into tertiles considering the baseline value of
HbA1c, the most marked improvements in HbA1c, blood glucose and triglycerides
were observed in the group with inadequate glucose control, both at the
three-month and two-year follow-ups. These results demonstrate that an
intensive lifestyle intervention should be recommended for people with type 2
diabetes, particularly those with the most inadequate glycaemic control. This
test validated the conclusion that people with type 2 diabetes and inadequate
glucose control not only obtained the greatest initial improvement from the
lifestyle intervention at three months as compared with people with good to
moderate glucose control, they maintained this improvement long term

      The opinion that can be made from this 5
references, lifestyle intervention for prevention of type 2 diabetes mellitus
are through weight loss, avoid obesity, physical activity such as diabetes
prevention program. We must avoid than cure because when someone getting type 2
diabetes mellitus, percentages of getting other chronical disease are higher
than the person who does not have it. Regular physical activity helps improve your overall health and
fitness and reduces your risk for many chronic diseases. Physical activity is
any body movement that works your muscles and requires more energy than
resting. Few example of physical activity is walking, running, dancing,
swimming, yoga, and gardening. Physical activity is good for many parts of your
body such as lungs and heart and it is also one part of a heart-healthy
lifestyle. A heart-healthy lifestyle also involves following a heart-healthy
eating, aiming
for a healthy weight, managing
stress, and quitting
smoking. Lifestyle
interventions included anthropometric, biochemical, clinical and fitness
measurements were collected. People with type 2 diabetes mellitus should be
recommended an intensive lifestyle intervention to decreased the chances of
getting another chronic disease. But, before choosing the most suitable
lifestyle intervention, people with type 2 diabetes mellitus should undergo an
initial medical examination, an interview by a psychologist, an assessment by a
dietician and nutritional intervention, physical examination by a sports
medicine specialist, individualized program and sessions with group therapeutic
education.

A major risk factor for
serious diseases such as cardiovascular disease, heart disease, and stroke, and
a primary cause of chronic kidney failure, non-traumatic lower-extremity
amputations, and blindness is Diabetes. Type 2 diabetes can be delayed or
avoided, through intensive of lifestyle, diet, and physical activity, that will
reduce excess body weight to get normal weight and prevented obesity for some
cases that can occurs. The Diabetes Prevention Program lifestyle intervention
shown that 58% decrease in the occurrence of type 2 diabetes among overweight
adults of difference race, gender and ethnicity at high-risk of developing type
2 diabetes. Results for The Diabetes Prevention Program in lifestyle
intervention showing achievement in dicreases of body weight over a period of 6
months with the range of 5–7%.

      The systematic review and meta-analysis
were conducted following the PRISMA guidelines. Firstly criteria were,
randomized controlled trials or cohort studies with or without a control group
that evaluated the effect of an intervention on weight loss. Next, based on the
Diabetes Prevention Program of lifestyle intervention shows that curriculum delivered
via eHealth approaches such as online applications, social media, addicted in
playing games, mobile applications, and certain computer-based telehealth
applications. After that, participants ages more than 18 years of age residing
in the US and lastly, study results published in English in a review article. Twenty-two
studies met the criteria for this research and which 26 interventions were
evaluated from this twenty-two studies after been review. Samples were choosen
are white and college educated people. Interventions included Web-based applications,
mobile phone applications, text messages, DVDs, interactive voice response
telephone calls, telehealth video conferencing, and video on-demand programing.
Nine interventions delivered post-baseline exclusively using eHealth were stand
by themselves and another seventeen interventions included additional
behavioral support provided by counselors post-baseline remotely with
communication technology or face-to-face. The estimated overall effect on mean
percentage weight loss from baseline to up to 15 months of follow-up across all
the interventions was ?3.98%. The subtotal estimate across the stand-alone
eHealth interventions was ?3.34% and it was less than the estimate across
interventions with behavioral support given by a counselor remotely which is ?4.31%,
and the estimate across interventions with behavioral support given by a
counselor in-person was ?4.65%. There is promising evidence of the efficacy of
DPP-based eHealth interventions on weight loss.

      Searching Medline, Cochrane, EMBASE, and
Google Scholar for randomized controlled trials that compared the standard of
care with treatment regimens that included changes in lifestyle  that is intervention group. The primary
outcome was reduction in risk factors of cardiovascular disease including body
mass index (BMI), glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c), systolic blood pressure (SBP),
diastolic blood pressure (DBP), high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-c),
and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-c). as a result, a total of 16
studies were included in the meta-analysis. The standardized difference in
means of change from baseline significantly favored the intervention compared with
the control group in BMI. There was no difference between the intervention and control
groups in HDL-c and LDL-c.

      One of the first randomized clinical
trials to demonstrate that a chronic disease could be prevented by adopting
lifestyle changes was The Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP). PubMed and Ovid
databases were searched to identify peer-reviewed original research articles on
DPP-based translations for adults at-risk for developing diabetes or
cardiovascular disease, limited to English language publications from January
2002–March 2015. The end of this study, 72 original research articles
describing 57 translation studies met eligibility criteria. All 57 study
interventions included a physical activity goal, 47 studies which is 82%
collected participant physical activity information, and 34 which is 60%
provided physical activity results. All 57 studies identified physical activity
as a key component of lifestyle interventions and provided a goal for physical
activity. The Diabetes Prevetion Program goal of 150 min of moderate physical
activity was utilized by 54 studies and three studies established alternative
goals including one with 180 min of moderate physical activity per week, one
with 200 min of moderate physical activity per week, and one with 4000 steps
per day above baseline physical activity level. The absence of physical
activity assessment standards or guidelines for use in community-based
translation programs and the under- and inconsistent reporting of physical
activity results in lifestyle change programs. Improvement in physical activity
assessment techniques and complete reporting of information on physical
activity assessment methods and outcomes at critical time periods will increase
the ability to examine the relationships between different levels of physical
activity and key clinical outcomes.

      The hypothesis that an intensive
lifestyle intervention for weight loss would achieve significantly greater
reductions in cardiovascular disease morbidity and mortality than a control
condition of diabetes support and education among participants with Type 2 Diabetes
Mellitus. A number of significant and long-term improvements were observed for
Intensive Lifestyle Intervention, including body weight, physical fitness and
physical function, glucose control, quality-of-life, and healthcare costs.
However, Intensive Lifestyle Intervention did not significantly reduce
cardiovascular disease-related morbidity/mortality such as cardiovascular
disease death, non-fatal myocardial infarction, non-fatal stroke, hospitalized
angina after nearly 10 years of follow-up. There was a suggestion of
heterogeneity of response based on the history of prior cardiovascular disease
at baseline (p = 0.06). Despite the overall lack of cardiovascular disease risk
reduction, Intensive Lifestyle Intervention remains important for care of
patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus, particularly when accompanied by
medication management. In particular, Intensive Lifestyle Iitervention may be
an appealing option for patients wanting to minimize medication
intensification. Also, Intensive Lifestyle Intervention carries with it other
potential benefits important to patients. For example, improvements in physical
functioning and quality of life. Based on data from other trials, intensive
medication management, such as tight glycemic control, is not without potential
risks, which should be weighed in making treatment decisions.

      The aim of this study was to assess, in a
group of people with type 2 diabetes, the impact of baseline values of
glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) on the effects of an intensive lifestyle
intervention on metabolic, clinical and strength parameters. For methods, 222
people with type 2 diabetes with mean standard deviation baseline HBA1c of
7.50% 1.27, were enrolled in a 3-month structured multidisciplinary lifestyle
intervention. Anthropometric, biochemical, clinical and fitness measurements
were collected at baseline, at the end of the lifestyle intervention program
and at the two-year follow-up visit. Significant improvements in glycometabolic
control, anthropometric parameters and systemic blood pressure were observed
both at the end of the three month intensive lifestyle program and at the
two-year follow up visit. In addition, defined daily doses of hypoglycaemic
treatment significantly decreased. Fitness measures exhibited significant
increments in the whole sample at the end of the intensive intervention program.
When patients were divided into tertiles considering the baseline value of
HbA1c, the most marked improvements in HbA1c, blood glucose and triglycerides
were observed in the group with inadequate glucose control, both at the
three-month and two-year follow-ups. These results demonstrate that an
intensive lifestyle intervention should be recommended for people with type 2
diabetes, particularly those with the most inadequate glycaemic control. This
test validated the conclusion that people with type 2 diabetes and inadequate
glucose control not only obtained the greatest initial improvement from the
lifestyle intervention at three months as compared with people with good to
moderate glucose control, they maintained this improvement long term

      The opinion that can be made from this 5
references, lifestyle intervention for prevention of type 2 diabetes mellitus
are through weight loss, avoid obesity, physical activity such as diabetes
prevention program. We must avoid than cure because when someone getting type 2
diabetes mellitus, percentages of getting other chronical disease are higher
than the person who does not have it. Regular physical activity helps improve your overall health and
fitness and reduces your risk for many chronic diseases. Physical activity is
any body movement that works your muscles and requires more energy than
resting. Few example of physical activity is walking, running, dancing,
swimming, yoga, and gardening. Physical activity is good for many parts of your
body such as lungs and heart and it is also one part of a heart-healthy
lifestyle. A heart-healthy lifestyle also involves following a heart-healthy
eating, aiming
for a healthy weight, managing
stress, and quitting
smoking. Lifestyle
interventions included anthropometric, biochemical, clinical and fitness
measurements were collected. People with type 2 diabetes mellitus should be
recommended an intensive lifestyle intervention to decreased the chances of
getting another chronic disease. But, before choosing the most suitable
lifestyle intervention, people with type 2 diabetes mellitus should undergo an
initial medical examination, an interview by a psychologist, an assessment by a
dietician and nutritional intervention, physical examination by a sports
medicine specialist, individualized program and sessions with g

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